Desire lines made in asphalt

The University of Utrecht had build new a office for the faculties of Science, Geosciences and Biomedical Sciences. The building was named after the prominent biologist Victor J. Koningsberger and has three lecture halls, offices, a cantina and an underlying garage (on street level) for 1,650 bicycles. More pictures of the building itself can be found at the website of the architects Ector Hoogstad.

Main cycleway to the University

Main cycleway to the University, sign shows the new bike garage

As a building site at the ever growing university complex isn’t special, it was the outdoor zone that attracted my attention. The campus was planned in the 1950s and is known by it’s grid structure and it’s straight lines. See for more history this nice blogpost of Mark Wagenbuur. But the entrance paths to the new bicycle garage set new standards for real curvy lines at the campus! Continue reading

Guidelines for cycle infrastructure versus common knowledge

Last autumn we had the first expert meeting to update the existing Dutch guidelines for bicycle infrastructure. The current guidelines date from 2003 and are available as a book and in a digital payed internet environment. There is large demand to the guidelines from abroad, so there is a translation available of the current guidelines.  At this moment the release of  the new guidelines is foreseen in November 2015. Until now a translation of the new manual is not foreseen.

History of guidelines

Dutch design guides weren’t written out of the blue. We started cycling in the late 1880’s and as bicycles and transport policy evolved, also our guidelines evolved. In the 1920’s the national policy was started to implement cycle paths along national roads outside the build up areas, with precise dimensions for width. In the 1930’s cycling was seen as a serious transport option into the development of new parts of cities, like Amsterdam-West. Continue reading

Conference season

Last week the Danes held their National Cycling Conference. Not in Copenhagen, but in Randers, the town that was announced the cycle city of the year. I was invited as a keynote speaker, to deliver some insights about cycling in the Netherlands. The Danes took full advantage of me, by putting me 3 times in the program. A pleasure for me, as I like Denmark and the Danes and I want to continue our friendly battle being the best cycling countries in the world. Continue reading